20 January 2010

PRICES OF GAS AROUND THE WORLD ! ! !

Prices of Gas Around the World
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Notice which countries have lower gas prices... when is America and Canada going to wake up? Funny, but serious.


Prices are quoted in US dollars per gallon for regular unleaded.

   



   

    Oslo, Norway

    $6.82

   

   
   

    Hong Kong

    $6.25

   

   
   

    Brussels, Belgium

    $6.16

   

   
   

    London, UK

    $5.96

   

   
   

    Rome, Italy

    $5.80

   

   
   

    Tokyo, Japan

    $5.25

   

   
   

    Sao Paulo, Brazil

    $4.42

   

   
   

    New Delhi, India

    $3.71

   

   
   

    Sidney , Australia

    $3.42

   

   
   

    Johannesburg, South Africa

    $3.39

   

   
   

    Mexico City

    $2.22

   

   
   

    Buenos Aires , Argentina

    $2.09

   



    Now watch closely...



   

    Riyadh , Saudi Arabia

    $0.91

   

   
   

    Kuwait

    $0.78

   

   
   

    Caracas , Venezuela

    $0.12



   

    Arkansas... they dont know what to do, just like the rest of us.



    Notice which countries have lower gas prices... when is America and Canada going to wake up? We have plenty of oil, but environmentalists are studying the impact which is OK by me.  I am  hoping that they will come up with a better alternative  but in the meantime we are at the mercy of  Arab countries and Venezuela .

   

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4 comments:

  1. I run my car on gas €0,65 per litre..!

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  2. .65E is equal to .91US. A gallon is worth approximately 4 liters so this adds up to $3.65 a gallon. That's not bad! Thanks for posting DR. I went to Belgium, Germany and Holland in October and you have to know where to shop. : )

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  3. Anne-Marie.....don't forget that, as you know, the Arabian states pay the same rate for water as we pay for fuel, and in the west we pay for water what they pay for fuel.

    Which would you rather have in the long run? :-)

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  4. Hi DD,

    I can only speak for Qatar. But for Qatari citizens, water is free. For expats it is subsidized by the government. Most people use bottled water for drinking. Its cheap. In the long run I would much rather prefer cheap fuel: think of our cold winters....See article below fresh from Qatar Tribune of Jan 20th, 2010:

    Qatar on top in per capita water consumption

    RAJESH MISHRA - DOHA Qatar tops the world when it comes to per capita water consumption. A country where the groundwater resource is depleting fast in the absence of adequate rain, it is ironical that people are consuming water in such a huge quantity.

    According to a report presented by the Director of Technical Affairs, Permanent P o p u l a t i o n Committee, Dr Hassan Ibrahim al Mohannadi, at the recent GSDP seminar, Qatar pushed the United States to the second spot in terms of per capita consumption of water.

    The report states: “According to the US Geological Survey, on an average, each US citizen consumes 575.5 litres of water per day whereas a Qatari resident uses 675.5 litres a day. A higher standard of living is the main reason behind the high demand of water in Qatar.”

    According to his study, a Qatari household on an average uses 74.5 percent of the total water consumed for toilet flushing and bathing and 2.1 percent for cooking. “The proportion of water used for drinking is minimal as a major portion of the drinking water requirement is met by bottled water, which is imported,” it added.

    The report said that despite the high cost of production of desalinated water, Qatari citizens availed it for free whereas expatriates had to pay a subsidised price for its use.

    “It was because of the rampant misuse of water that Law No (26) of 2008 was enacted. This regulation was aimed at rationalising the use of water,” it added.

    It may be noted that production of one cubic metre of desalinated water in Qatar is $1.64 while the operation and distribution cost comes to $1.1. The government supports this sector with QR 829 million annually, the report says.

    The report also mentions that in the sixties a fee was levied on the consumers of water in the country to regulate its use but when people took to the streets in protest it was withdrawn.


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